Tag Archives: Blender 3d

Some more sculpting practice in Blender 2.78. I started this for the Sculpt January challenge, but unfortunately this is the only one I managed to get so far.  I’ll hopefully get a few more done throughout the next few weeks.

Gunslingers: Digital sculpting and 3D printing

Clubber King pics

Being a child of the 70s and 80s I was a d&d roleplayer. Along with that went the love of all things miniature, mostly painting, I never really seemed to have the dexterity for sculpting.

In the past few years 3D printing has come a long way. Blender’s sculpting tools have also developed a lot in the last couple of years, so I thought it was about time to sit down and put all these elements together and try to produce something out of a couple of sketches I’d done a while back. Here are the results. Two gunslingers, printed by Shapeways, where I have a shop set up. The figures are around 35mm, slightly bigger than normal tabletops miniatures (that’s a 10p slotted in beside in them to show scale). They’re printed in HiDef Acrylite, which seems to be the best material Shapeways currently have for miniature printing, it prints at a 50 micron layer thickness in black, you can see the layers on the closeups. These cover up quite well once an undercoat is on. I’m very pleased with the way they’ve turned out, with not much cleanup, hopefully I’ll get around to painting them soon. There’s also a rendered turnaround of the sculpt below.

#Shapeways

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Turtle-y Blender!

Turtle BI1

I know, I know, bad pun, but what else was I going to call this post!?

Here’s a guy I’ve been working on the past week, for a bit of modelling practice, but also more importantly for texturing practice. I haven’t really done much in the way of painted textures in Blender, so I thought I’d work on this and see where I got to. The AMD Radeon 6750 in my IMac seems to handle the viewport GLSL display pretty well. So here he is. He has a basic rig for posing, but I’m going to work up a proper animation rig over the next couple of weeks and see how he turns out. Might be a bit tricky with the shell, but we’ll see. He doesn’t have a name yet, so suggestions on a postcard, please!

Bughunting!

Here’s my June entry for the 11 Second Club, using the CG Cookie rig with some custom added texturing. I did a bit better with this one, 77th out of 190, I’m pretty happy with that. As usual though, I’d have liked more time on this to smooth a few problems out and give their faces a bit more expression. I’m still trying to figure out a good workflow with Blender as far as character animation goes. I’ve read various methods from different animators, so I’m just trying to settle on one that I’m comfortable with and is the most efficient. It’s very easy to get lost in keyframes for all the body parts early on so you need to use your time wisely.

This time round I worked up a rough 2D version in DigiCel’s Flipbook first. This helped when I started the blocking phase in Blender, and also helped me to iron out a few parts where I wasn’t sure how the body was going to move and what timing it would take, it was a very big help in the breakdown phase too.

Family of Thieves

My May entry for the 11 second club. I actually managed to enter this one, but only placed about 120th out of about 240 entries. Tried to concentrate on the lip sync on this one and keep it simple. A bit more time would have been nice to polish it up more.
Blender 2.66 with a slightly modified Cookie rig.

Picard on Shore Leave

Picard goes on on well-earned shore leave, but is extremely disappointed when he see’s what’s waiting for him.

This was my final render of the April’s 11 Second Club challenge. Unfortunately I didn’t get this finished in time to enter, but I thought I’d finish it anyway, saying as I’d already got so far with it. It’s far from perfect, but I’m starting to get the hang of more complex animation in Blender now. I got my hands on the CGCookie’s Blender Animation Toolkit recently, highly recommended if you’ve just started to work on character animation in Blender and you want to move it up a step.
All done in Blender 2.6 with the CGCookie Cookie Rig.

Franssiss – Sunday Short #9

Here’s a cute camera tracking experiment with Blender, directed by Mathieu Auvray. All done in Blender, except for the compositing which was done in After Effects. This is a perfect example of how far on Blender has come in the past couple of years as a stronger production tool.

Sally character – wip 2

Here’s the latest mesh of Sally, co-star of our 3d short, iRover. I think this is pretty much the finished mesh now. I still have some tweaks to add in a few folds to her clothes, and I need to work some more on her textures, like her eyelashes, eyebrows and hair. I’ve decided not to use particle hair in this, I still haven’t quite got the hang of it, so I’m sticking to poly hair for now. She’ll also need a couple of wardrobe changes throughout which I’ll work on later. But this will be enough for now to work on a rig. I did some mild tweaking to her face and head, my previous version seemed a little too young in my opinion, you can see the comparison in the pic below. I think you’ll agree she looks a lot more natural.

Tears of Steel – Sunday Short #6

This week saw the release of the 4th short film from the Blender Foundation called ‘Tears of Steel’. Traditionally these shorts test out and implement any new features that have been in the pipeline for latest versions of Blender.

This time round, we see a slight change to the style of the short. The first three films were all exclusively 3d animation, but with Tears of Steel the focus is on visual effects. In the later versions of Blender, the Foundation has been gradually working on some major new features, most notably the 3d camera tracking system. Along with the various node and compositor improvements, the purpose of this short was to try out the with visual effects enhancements.

Although the film has generally received favourably, it has been slightly slated for not having much of a storyline compared to the previous shorts. The acting is slightly hammy in some places, but the music is beautifully produced. As a demonstration of Blender’s current abilities though, it’s a great showcase. In the short time that the small team had to produce the Mango Project, its working title, visually looks great and they’ve managed to cram a great deal of concept into the 12 minutes. Although Sintel stands as the more inspirational of the four films, because of its combination of great design and storytelling, Tears of Steel still manages to create a feeling of pride amongst the Blenderhead community.

As a bonus here are the links to the other three films, have your own little Blender film festival and enjoy!

Elephants Dream

Big Buck Bunny

Sintel